1,520 Alzheimers Headlines
Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute
St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Produced by MD Health Channel
Executive Editor.....Anne-Merete Robbs
CEO..............Stan Swartz

Dr. Reyes and his team are constantly working on new medicines and new solutions...You will receive news alerts...information on new trials as Dr Reyes announces them!
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center



DO YOU HAVE ALZHEIMERS?
 
"HELP DR. REYES... IN HIS BATTLE TO FIND A CURE...
.HE NEEDS YOUR HELP:
YOU CAN HELP WIN THE BATTLE FOR A CURE BY JOINING A TRIAL!!"....

Stan Swartz, CEO,
The MD Health Channel



"You'll receive all medication and study based procedures at
no charge

if you qualify for one of the many trials being conducted at Barrow Neurological Institute."
 

"Dr. Reyes Changed My Life"

- John Swartz
92 Years Old
Attorney at Law
"Dr.Reyes Changed My Life "
1:18
"At 92...I had lost my will to live"
5:48
Tips on Aging
2:29
"Dr. Reyes gave me customized health care"
2:09

Patricio Reyes M.D.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"PRESERVING BRAIN FUNCTIONS "
Runtime: 50:22
Runtime: 50:22
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Runtime: 10:27
Runtime: 10:27
ALZHEIMER'S AWARENESS PROGRAMS
Runtime: 5:00
Runtime: 5:00
BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
PDF Document 850 kb

Download Free

4 TALES OF NEUROSURGERY &
A PIANO CONCERT BY DR. SPETZLER...
Plus 2 books written by Survivors for Survivors!
Robert F. Spetzler M.D.
Director, Barrow Neurological Institute

J.N. Harber Chairman of Neurological Surgery

Professor Section of Neurosurgery
University of Arizona
TALES OF NEUROSURGERY:
A pregnant mother..a baby..faith of a husband.. .plus... Cardiac Standstill: cooling the patient to 15 degrees Centigrade!
Lou Grubb Anurism
The young Heros - kids who are confronted with significant medical problems!
2 Patients...confronted with enormous decisions before their surgery...wrote these books to help others!
A 1 MINUTE PIANO CONCERT BY DR. SPETZLER

Michele M. Grigaitis MS, NP
Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Disorders Clinic

Barrow Neurological Clinics
COPING WITH DEMENTIA
 
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Tuesday, June 20, 2017

 

Alzheimers Q & A: What types of activities are best suited for those with Alzheimer's or dementia?







































Image Source: DANABLOG

What types of activities are best suited for those with Alzheimer's or dementia?

It is important to match activities to interests and cognitive ability in order to increase participation and satisfaction for those with Alzheimer's disease or dementia. If they're not, it's unlikely that person will participate.

For individuals with mild to moderate cognitive functions, integrate music in all types of activities, especially through sing-a-longs, dancing, entertainment, drumming and exercising. Music of the person's era will motivate the individual and also stimulate dialogue and reminisces.

Additionally, mental stimulation games, such as word games, trivia, spelling bees and magazine scavenger hunts, can be very successful for individuals with mild cognitive functions.

Incorporate cooking activities, which can arouse the senses and provide a means of stimulating exchanges between the affected individual, caregiver and family members. Aromas can invoke special memories of family times and holidays, and some individuals enjoy preparing recipes and also tasting the finished dish.

Gardening is another favorite activity and quite manageable for those experiencing mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Planting and tending gardens can give the them a sense of purpose and builds self-esteem.

Since many individuals with Alzheimer's disease become socially isolated, social events such as parties, arts and crafts and even spiritual activities can provide opportunities for fellowship and enjoyment and give the individual a sense of belonging. Reminiscing, history talks of his or her era and pleasurable outings are all means of keeping the individual engaged and active.

With technology so prevalent, computer activities have the potential to make unoccupied time meaningful and enjoyable and also improve specific cognitive performance, such as hand-eye coordination, processing skills and creativity. Whether a novice or somewhat technologically inclined, using a computer provides an increased sense of productivity and accomplishment.

Integrating music in activity programming is also important. The Music and Memory program, for instance, matches the individual with a playlist of songs to provide them with listening pleasure.

Additionally, incorporating sensory activities is essential in late stages of the disease. Aromatherapy can be used for effect, such as lavender for calming and peppermint for stimulation. These scents can be infused into lotions and creams for gentle massages, which soothe the affected individual and also keeps him or her connected to the caregiver.

Sensory kits, such as "A Day at the Beach" kit, features items like a CD that plays ocean waves, seashells and/or sand for touch and tactile stimulation, coconut tanning oil for smells and fruit smoothies for taste.

Affected individuals with low cognitive function may also find comfort in attachments, whether it is a special blanket or stuffed animal, and holding or clutching these types of objects can be a coping strategy for them.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by THEADVOCATE
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length