1,520 Alzheimers Headlines
Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute
St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Produced by MD Health Channel
Executive Editor.....Anne-Merete Robbs
CEO..............Stan Swartz

Dr. Reyes and his team are constantly working on new medicines and new solutions...You will receive news alerts...information on new trials as Dr Reyes announces them!
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center



DO YOU HAVE ALZHEIMERS?
 
"HELP DR. REYES... IN HIS BATTLE TO FIND A CURE...
.HE NEEDS YOUR HELP:
YOU CAN HELP WIN THE BATTLE FOR A CURE BY JOINING A TRIAL!!"....

Stan Swartz, CEO,
The MD Health Channel



"You'll receive all medication and study based procedures at
no charge

if you qualify for one of the many trials being conducted at Barrow Neurological Institute."
 

"Dr. Reyes Changed My Life"

- John Swartz
92 Years Old
Attorney at Law
"Dr.Reyes Changed My Life "
1:18
"At 92...I had lost my will to live"
5:48
Tips on Aging
2:29
"Dr. Reyes gave me customized health care"
2:09

Patricio Reyes M.D.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"PRESERVING BRAIN FUNCTIONS "
Runtime: 50:22
Runtime: 50:22
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Runtime: 10:27
Runtime: 10:27
ALZHEIMER'S AWARENESS PROGRAMS
Runtime: 5:00
Runtime: 5:00
BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
PDF Document 850 kb

Download Free

4 TALES OF NEUROSURGERY &
A PIANO CONCERT BY DR. SPETZLER...
Plus 2 books written by Survivors for Survivors!
Robert F. Spetzler M.D.
Director, Barrow Neurological Institute

J.N. Harber Chairman of Neurological Surgery

Professor Section of Neurosurgery
University of Arizona
TALES OF NEUROSURGERY:
A pregnant mother..a baby..faith of a husband.. .plus... Cardiac Standstill: cooling the patient to 15 degrees Centigrade!
Lou Grubb Anurism
The young Heros - kids who are confronted with significant medical problems!
2 Patients...confronted with enormous decisions before their surgery...wrote these books to help others!
A 1 MINUTE PIANO CONCERT BY DR. SPETZLER

Michele M. Grigaitis MS, NP
Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Disorders Clinic

Barrow Neurological Clinics
COPING WITH DEMENTIA
 
Free Windows Media Player Click

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Barrow Neurological Institute

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Thursday, February 19, 2009

 

AAN: Nimble Activity Protects Against Mild Cognitive Impairment


SEATTLE, Feb. 18 -- Middle-age and older adults who prefer a mental workout to passive activities, such as watching TV, may be less likely to develop memory loss as they age, researchers said.

Mentally stimulating social activity and reading in middle age reduced the likelihood of mild cognitive impairment in old age by more than 40%, found Yonas E. Geda, M.D., of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues.

After age 65, reading, making crafts, using the computer, playing games, and watching less TV were associated with 30% to 50% lower risk of mild cognitive impairment, Dr. Geda's group reported in a case-control study to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology meeting here.

Dr. Geda said these findings provide concrete evidence for the "use it or lose it" axiom. "This means perhaps aging does not have to be a simple passive process."

In the multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, and education, the researchers found the following activities done over the prior year late in life protective against mild cognitive impairment:

  • Reading books (odds ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 0.94)
  • Playing games (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.90)
  • Crafting activities, such as quilting or pottery (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.93)
  • Computer activities (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.71)
  • Watching television less (OR 0.48 for fewer than seven hours per day versus more, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.86)

Dr. Geda cautioned that the findings were based on patients' memories of activities and need to be confirmed in prospective studies.

full story and video in MedPage Today


Thursday, February 12, 2009

 

A Way Found to Judge Driving Safety of Alzheimer's Patients

IOWA CITY, Iowa, Feb. 11 -- The difficult judgment call on whether Alzheimer's patients are safe to drive can be helped by a battery of cognitive tests, researchers here said.

"By measuring driver performance through off-road tests of memory, visual, and motor abilities, we may be able to develop a standardized assessment of a person's fitness to drive," Dr. Dawson said.

To determine whether performance on tests of cognition, visual perception, and motor function could predict the level of safety in licensed drivers with early Alzheimer's, the researchers conducted a controlled trial of 40 patients with mild disease and 115 patients without dementia.

"Given that driving puts demands on diverse cognitive functions, it is unlikely that a test of any single cognitive ability will be an accurate predictor of driving safety," the researchers said.

The study may have been limited by a lack of investigation of other environmental factors, such as having family members in the vehicle and time of day, as well as a possible lack of generalizability because only seven of the 40 patients in the experimental group were women.

Still, the researchers concluded that for predicting safety errors within the Alzheimer's disease group, "off-road neuropsychological tests of cognition, vision, and motor abilities gave additional information above and beyond diagnosis alone. Hence, performance on these tests can be helpful when predicting whether a patient with Alzheimer's disease can safely drive a vehicle."
full story in Medpage Today

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

 

VIDEO WEBCAST - Levodopa-Unresponsive Parkinson's Disease

Kapil D. Sethi, MD, Professor of Neurology; Director, Movement Disorders Program, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta
Medscape Today