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Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute
St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
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"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center



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Patricio Reyes M.D.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"PRESERVING BRAIN FUNCTIONS "
Runtime: 50:22
Runtime: 50:22
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Runtime: 10:27
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ALZHEIMER'S AWARENESS PROGRAMS
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BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
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Robert F. Spetzler M.D.
Director, Barrow Neurological Institute

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Professor Section of Neurosurgery
University of Arizona
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Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Disorders Clinic

Barrow Neurological Clinics
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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

 

Know the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer's: VIDEO
























Bruce and Anne Hunt, both 80, have found ways to cope with Anne's Alzheimer's.

For Anne Hunt, clues that something wasn't quite right started to mount. She was repeating herself. And forgetting things.

Hunt, 80, had always been organized. But the Chicago woman increasingly found herself confused about plans. Did she agree to that date, or was she supposed to follow up?

Her daughter suggested she talk to a doctor about whether she might have Alzheimer's, the degenerative brain disease that impairs memory, thinking and reasoning. After examining brain scans, the doctor confirmed that Hunt's symptoms indicated Alzheimer's.

Hunt's confusion about time and place is one of 10 warning signs of the disease, according to the Alzheimer's Association, whose Greater Illinois chapter recently held a public education session on the topic in Chicago. The association says more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's, the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.

Most warning signs are related to memory loss or confusion that poses challenges in daily life. People with the disease might experience one or more symptoms to varying degrees. The organization recommends seeing a doctor if you notice one of the signs, because early detection can mean getting the most benefit from available treatments.

A dozen people attended the seminar, where the chapter's manager of education and outreach, Phillip Bennett, cautioned that just because a person exhibits a warning sign doesn't mean he or she has Alzheimer's.

For example, he asked, how many people have called one of their children by another child's name? Hands went up as people laughed. A memory lapse like this doesn't necessarily signal Alzheimer's, he said. It might simply be a side effect of aging, or it could be a different form of dementia. Many people struggle to find a word, he added, but someone with Alzheimer's might stop in the middle of the conversation and have no idea how to continue.

Similarly, we all lose things from time to time, but someone with Alzheimer's might be incapable of retracing his steps in an effort to find that misplaced item. And perhaps someone isn't good with directions. But a person with Alzheimer's might drive 20 minutes to church and take three hours to get home because they can't remember the route.

"Someone with the disease (might) remember what happened to them when they were 9 years old," Bennett said. "But they can't remember what happened three minutes ago."

Other signs include withdrawal from work or social activities. Changes in mood or personality also can be a sign — such as feeling suspicious, fearful or anxious.

"They may have been very mild-mannered," Bennett said. "Now they're cursing in church."

Annette Campbell, 72, attended the seminar to get a better understanding of what's "normal" when it comes to forgetting things.

"You do wonder," the Chicago woman said. "I don't remember as well as I used to. It's good to know the symptoms."

Hunt, who didn't attend the session, learned she had Alzheimer's a few years ago. She'd watched her mother and aunt age with what was likely Alzheimer's, so she was well acquainted with the symptoms. But she didn't expect the diagnosis.

"I was surprised," she said, "I think partly because I didn't want to hear it."

She and her husband, Bruce, work together to manage her symptoms, such as forgetting things or becoming confused during a conversation.

Every morning, they meditate and map out the day. Anne keeps a daily to-do list, which helps her stay focused and remember tasks. They also write reminders on a dry-erase calendar.

Having been married for 60 years, the Hunts know the power of communication. If Anne is struggling for a word, Bruce will ask if she would like help or if she'd rather figure it out on her own.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by CHICAGOTRIBUNE
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

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