1,520 Alzheimers Headlines
Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute
St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Produced by MD Health Channel
Executive Editor.....Anne-Merete Robbs
CEO..............Stan Swartz

Dr. Reyes and his team are constantly working on new medicines and new solutions...You will receive news alerts...information on new trials as Dr Reyes announces them!
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center



DO YOU HAVE ALZHEIMERS?
 
"HELP DR. REYES... IN HIS BATTLE TO FIND A CURE...
.HE NEEDS YOUR HELP:
YOU CAN HELP WIN THE BATTLE FOR A CURE BY JOINING A TRIAL!!"....

Stan Swartz, CEO,
The MD Health Channel



"You'll receive all medication and study based procedures at
no charge

if you qualify for one of the many trials being conducted at Barrow Neurological Institute."
 

"Dr. Reyes Changed My Life"

- John Swartz
92 Years Old
Attorney at Law
"Dr.Reyes Changed My Life "
1:18
"At 92...I had lost my will to live"
5:48
Tips on Aging
2:29
"Dr. Reyes gave me customized health care"
2:09

Patricio Reyes M.D.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"PRESERVING BRAIN FUNCTIONS "
Runtime: 50:22
Runtime: 50:22
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Runtime: 10:27
Runtime: 10:27
ALZHEIMER'S AWARENESS PROGRAMS
Runtime: 5:00
Runtime: 5:00
BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
PDF Document 850 kb

Download Free

4 TALES OF NEUROSURGERY &
A PIANO CONCERT BY DR. SPETZLER...
Plus 2 books written by Survivors for Survivors!
Robert F. Spetzler M.D.
Director, Barrow Neurological Institute

J.N. Harber Chairman of Neurological Surgery

Professor Section of Neurosurgery
University of Arizona
TALES OF NEUROSURGERY:
A pregnant mother..a baby..faith of a husband.. .plus... Cardiac Standstill: cooling the patient to 15 degrees Centigrade!
Lou Grubb Anurism
The young Heros - kids who are confronted with significant medical problems!
2 Patients...confronted with enormous decisions before their surgery...wrote these books to help others!
A 1 MINUTE PIANO CONCERT BY DR. SPETZLER

Michele M. Grigaitis MS, NP
Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Disorders Clinic

Barrow Neurological Clinics
COPING WITH DEMENTIA
 
Free Windows Media Player Click

Links
Barrow Neurological Institute

Archives
October 2006  
November 2006  
December 2006  
January 2007  
February 2007  
March 2007  
May 2007  
June 2007  
November 2007  
December 2007  
April 2008  
July 2008  
August 2008  
September 2008  
October 2008  
November 2008  
December 2008  
January 2009  
February 2009  
March 2009  
April 2009  
May 2009  
February 2010  
March 2013  
May 2013  
November 2013  
January 2014  
February 2014  
March 2014  
April 2014  
May 2014  
June 2014  
July 2014  
June 2016  
July 2016  
August 2016  
September 2016  
October 2016  
November 2016  
December 2016  
January 2017  
February 2017  
March 2017  
April 2017  
May 2017  
June 2017  
July 2017  
August 2017  
September 2017  
October 2017  
November 2017  
December 2017  
January 2018  
February 2018  
March 2018  
April 2018  
May 2018  
June 2018  
July 2018  
August 2018  
September 2018  
October 2018  
November 2018  

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Friday, September 2, 2016

 

Hippocampal Atrophy in Depression Not Necessarily Alzheimer’s




























Image Source: ASIANSCIENTIST

Reductions in hippocampal volume occurring with late-life depression have no association with levels of amyloid deposition, indicating that hippocampal volume reduction may not necessarily be relied upon as a sign of the onset of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research.

"Lower hippocampal volume was not related to amyloid pathology in this sample of patients with late-life depression," the authors write.

"These data counter the common belief that changes in hippocampal volume in late-life depression are due to prodromal Alzheimer's disease," they add.

The findings come from a study published online August 19 in the American Journal of Psychiatry..

These findings have important clinical implications, because hippocampal volume is a measure that is routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with Alzheimer's disease, senior author Mathieu Vandenbulcke, MD, PhD, of the Department of Old Age Psychiatry, Universitair Psychiatrisch Centrum KU Leuven, Belgium, told Medscape Medical News.

"The clinical message from this is that doctors should be careful in interpreting mild changes in hippocampal volume when they suspect Alzheimer's disease in patients with a late-life depression," he said.

Changes Seen in Depressed Patients' Brains

The study was conducted in 100 patients older than 60 years who were recruited from the Department of Old Age Psychiatry of the University Psychiatric Center, in Leuven, Belgium. Of the particiapnts, 48 were currently depressed older adults, and 52 were healthy age- and sex-matched control persons.

Assessments with structural MRI, [18F]flutemetamol amyloid positron-emission tomography, apolipoprotein E genotyping, and neurophysical assessment showed there were significant differences in mean normalized total hippocampal volume between persons who were and who were not depressed (P = .02).

There were no differences between the two groups with regard to cortical amyloid uptake or proportion of amyloid-positive patients. Amyloid deposition is considered a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.

After excluding persons who were positive for amyloid deposition, those with depression still showed greater reductions in hippocampal volume. Furthermore, no association was seen between hippocampal volume and amyloid uptake in either group.

Several Theories to Explain the Findings

It is well documented that reductions in hippocampal volume occur with late-life depression. Such reductions are often suspected of having a link to Alzheimer's disease, because the disease is characterized by hippocampal atrophy and because Alzheimer's disease is often preceded by late-life depression.

In the absence of amyloid pathology, alternative theories for the hippocampal volume loss with late-life depression include a suspected nonamyloid pathology. This could explain a known link between the volume loss and the increased risk for dementia with late-life depression, the authors explain.

It is also believed that vascular impairment may play a role in nonamyloid brain changes. The new study found no association between white matter hyperintensity and hippocampal volume.

Another theory is the stress hypothesis, according to which loss of hippocampal volume could result from stress-related mechanisms such as toxicity from elevations in the level of cortisol. This theory is supported by some studies linking longer duration of depression with smaller hippocampal volume.

Dr Vandenbulcke noted, however, that the new study found no evidence of a significant decrease in hippocampal volume in a subset of patients with early-onset depression (onset before the age 55 years, 42%) compared with late-onset depression.

Yet another theory for the hippocampal reduction in late-life depression is the "vulnerability hypothesis," according to which preexisting lower hippocampal volume may itself be a cause of sensitivity to depression and stress, rather than an effect.

"As the hippocampus is involved in stress and emotion regulation, it is possible that a lower hippocampal volume predisposes to depression," Dr Vandenbulcke explained.

"Moreover, normal aging is also associated with mild hippocampal volume changes. These effects may be additive, leading to increased risk for depression later in life, next to age-related psychosocial stressors," he said.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MEDSCAPE
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length