1,520 Alzheimers Headlines
Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute
St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Produced by MD Health Channel
Executive Editor.....Anne-Merete Robbs
CEO..............Stan Swartz

Dr. Reyes and his team are constantly working on new medicines and new solutions...You will receive news alerts...information on new trials as Dr Reyes announces them!
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Patricio Reyes M.D., F.A.N.N.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center



DO YOU HAVE ALZHEIMERS?
 
"HELP DR. REYES... IN HIS BATTLE TO FIND A CURE...
.HE NEEDS YOUR HELP:
YOU CAN HELP WIN THE BATTLE FOR A CURE BY JOINING A TRIAL!!"....

Stan Swartz, CEO,
The MD Health Channel



"You'll receive all medication and study based procedures at
no charge

if you qualify for one of the many trials being conducted at Barrow Neurological Institute."
 

"Dr. Reyes Changed My Life"

- John Swartz
92 Years Old
Attorney at Law
"Dr.Reyes Changed My Life "
1:18
"At 92...I had lost my will to live"
5:48
Tips on Aging
2:29
"Dr. Reyes gave me customized health care"
2:09

Patricio Reyes M.D.
Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Alzheimer's Disease & Cognitive Disorders Clinics; Phoenix, AZ; Chief Medical Officer, Retired NFL Players Association

Barrow Neurological Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
"PRESERVING BRAIN FUNCTIONS "
Runtime: 50:22
Runtime: 50:22
"2 NEW THERAPIES FOR ALZHEIMER'S"
Runtime: 10:27
Runtime: 10:27
ALZHEIMER'S AWARENESS PROGRAMS
Runtime: 5:00
Runtime: 5:00
BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
PDF Document 850 kb

Download Free

4 TALES OF NEUROSURGERY &
A PIANO CONCERT BY DR. SPETZLER...
Plus 2 books written by Survivors for Survivors!
Robert F. Spetzler M.D.
Director, Barrow Neurological Institute

J.N. Harber Chairman of Neurological Surgery

Professor Section of Neurosurgery
University of Arizona
TALES OF NEUROSURGERY:
A pregnant mother..a baby..faith of a husband.. .plus... Cardiac Standstill: cooling the patient to 15 degrees Centigrade!
Lou Grubb Anurism
The young Heros - kids who are confronted with significant medical problems!
2 Patients...confronted with enormous decisions before their surgery...wrote these books to help others!
A 1 MINUTE PIANO CONCERT BY DR. SPETZLER

Michele M. Grigaitis MS, NP
Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Disorders Clinic

Barrow Neurological Clinics
COPING WITH DEMENTIA
 
Free Windows Media Player Click

Links
Barrow Neurological Institute

Archives
October 2006  
November 2006  
December 2006  
January 2007  
February 2007  
March 2007  
May 2007  
June 2007  
November 2007  
December 2007  
April 2008  
July 2008  
August 2008  
September 2008  
October 2008  
November 2008  
December 2008  
January 2009  
February 2009  
March 2009  
April 2009  
May 2009  
February 2010  
March 2013  
May 2013  
November 2013  
January 2014  
February 2014  
March 2014  
April 2014  
May 2014  
June 2014  
July 2014  
June 2016  
July 2016  
August 2016  
September 2016  
October 2016  
November 2016  
December 2016  
January 2017  
February 2017  
March 2017  
April 2017  
May 2017  
June 2017  
July 2017  
August 2017  
September 2017  
October 2017  
November 2017  
December 2017  
January 2018  
February 2018  
March 2018  
April 2018  
May 2018  
June 2018  
July 2018  

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

 

Early drug tests show success treating Alzheimer's as 'diabetes of the brain': VIDEO























Half of patients taking T3D-959 show significant memory improvement

Are researchers close to redefining how Alzheimer's disease causes brain cells to fail?

A new drug known as T3D-959 treats the disease as though it's actually "diabetes of the brain" -- and many medical experts are encouraged by its results so far in drug studies.

"It's a unique molecule, a unique investigational drug which is designed to hit the very earliest stages before even the plaques and tangles develop and the memory problems develop in these patients," explained Dr. Warren Strittmatter, chief scientific officer at T3D Therapeutics and the former chief of neurology at Duke University Medical Center.

Strittmatter said the brain is dependent on glucose as an energy source. A reduction in glucose metabolism in the brain is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease.

"Cells of the brain, like we see cells in the body of diabetes, are not able to use glucose as much," said Dr. Marc Agronin, a geriatric psychiatrist serving as the drug's principal investigator. "The goal of the medication like T3D-959 would be to enhance brain cells' ability to use this fuel to enhance metabolism."

The phase 2 study involved just 36 patients at two sites in North Carolina and Florida.

There was no placebo. Each patient received the actual drug, T3D-959, taking it once a day for just two weeks.

The impact was almost immediate. Researchers measured significant memory improvement in 53 percent of patients. Many caregivers were astonished.

"They saw their loved ones being more involved and engaged in activities during the day," Agronin said. "They felt that they were sharper in terms of memory and language. They were more organized during the day."

Jim Wessler, president of the the Mass/NH Alzheimer's Association, said he believes the early results for T3D-959 are "phenomenal," but cautioned against celebrating too soon.

"Given the very small sample size, we really need to see more participants to see if this holds up as you move from dozens to hundreds of participants," Wessler said. "But I would say encouraging."

Researchers hope to expand the study within the next 18 months to hundreds of patients at sites across the country.

"The main message here is that there is hope for improving the quality of lives for people with Alzheimer's disease," Agronin said. "There's hope in getting closer to a cure."

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by WCVB5
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

Labels: